Category Archives: 2019

The Prescriptions (Nashville, TN)

The Prescriptions — She Is Waiting

“Hollywood Gold…demonstrates a considerable breadth in Ragsdale’s writing, ranging from Laurel Canyon folk rock and Americana to echoes of vibey new wave and power pop.”

— Billboard Magazine

Formed in 2015, Nashville-based rock band The Prescriptions have quickly become a “must see” act in the southeastern regional music scene. Following the release of their EP “Either Side” in 2016, The Prescriptions have maintained a healthy performance schedule while continuing to move forward musically. On April 5th, 2019 the band released their first full-length LP “Hollywood Gold” on Single Lock Records.

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Preston Lovinggood (Birmingham, AL)

“…a sincere blend of longing guitar and sentimental hums…”

— Alt Press

The last time we heard from Preston Lovinggood was with his stunning 2014 album, Shadow Songs. The soundscape of songs showcased Lovinggood’s intricately-detailed, and low-key funny tales of love, longing, and loss, even spawning a lo-fi companion album, Sun Songs.

Consequences,  Lovinggood’s new album, is his best, most concise, and hook-laden album to date, which manages to conjure a unique soundscape of its own: sun-kissed, modern pop that pulls off the neat trick of appearing straightforward when, upon further inspection, the music often trails off into subtle psychedelic curls.

Lovinggood’s music is properly cinematic, sustaining moods, characters, and themes, and Consequences is, in a sense, a “break-up” record, but the storyline resists linear narrative and opts for a cut-up approach – its two lovers unstuck in time.

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DATENIGHT (Nashville, TN)

DATENIGHT — Poor Exchange

“Bent on frenzy and full of personal flair Datenight’s Comin Atcha’ 100MPH proves their album’s name over and over again. This music isn’t self-conscious at all. Balancing heavy strums with wrist-breaking flails these guys give hope for the future of punk music. The longest song comes in at blistering two minutes and twenty seconds, the shortest at a minute and twenty-two. There’s no hiding behind effects boards or post-production. They don’t go ham on guitar pedals and the vocals are nearly bone dry. These guys had to just write fast catchy punk songs and they sure as hell did.”

— Post Trash

In a high-school music classroom in Nashville, Tennessee, guitars are falling from the ceiling. During a break from teaching the jazz compositions of Wes Montgomery, high-school guitar teacher Doc makes a fatal mistake and walks out of the classroom, leaving the students of Nashville’s School of the Arts completely unsupervised. As the story goes, while he was away three students opened up the ceiling tiles and laid all of the school’s acoustic guitars up there, covering the ceiling like a wooden blanket. When Doc re-entered the classroom ten minutes later he heard two things: the sound of “Janie Jones” playing over the loudspeakers and a rumble that any ordinary person might describe as an earthquake with a magnitude of at least 4 or higher. Fortunately, the ceiling collapse didn’t hurt anyone as bad as an earthquake might have, but it did get the three students responsible suspended for two and a half weeks. So, what did those three do with their 13 days away? They formed DATENIGHT and never looked back. Boredom breeds Rock’n’Roll.

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Easter Island (Atlanta, GA)

Photo by Wes Gregory

Easter Island — You Don't Have a Choice

“…Sweeping, bold, ethereal, lush, driving, haunting, commanding, dreamy, layered, methodical, atmospheric, triumphant, glassy, and lovely. In the end, the best way to describe [Easter Island] is, simply, damn near perfect.”

— Flagpole

Formed in Athens, GA, Easter Island is a dreampop act fronted by guitarists Ethan Payne and Ryan Monahan, whose sound has been likened to Explosions in The Sky, My Bloody Valentine, DIIV, Pedro the Lion, and more. The band’s falsetto vocals and panoramic guitars are countered by its muscular rhythm section – Asher Payne (keyboards), John Swint (drums), and Justin Ellis (bass) all serve to add gravity to an otherwise weightless sound.

The band has traveled as far as Japan to work on new material and to film their latest music video, “Island Nation”, which was recently premiered by Paste Magazine . Produced and engineered by Ryan Monahan, the songs have received additional engineering, mixing, and mastering from Mike Albanese at Espresso Machine Recording. The band’s followup single, “Always Room For Another”, premiered on Billboard in fall 2018.

The past three years have seen the band working in various studios on their new record while touring the U.S at large, including appearances at SXSW, CMJ, Treefort, and Athfest in their hometown of Athens. The band’s debut record Frightened (2012), led to a number of television syncs, including ABC’s “Off The Map”, MTV’s “Awkward”, and a recent live appearance on CW’s Dynasty which aired in early 2019.

Throughout Easter Island’s near 10 year career, the band has had the opportunity to share the stage with David Bazan, Cindy Wilson (of The B5s), The Low Anthem, Bully, Wild Nothing, White Rabbits, Valley Maker, and more. The band plans to release their follow LP, Island Nation, in 2019.

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Mouton (Fayetteville, AR)

Mouton — Fear and Trembling

“Rife with hooks and snarled twang, “Other Minds” is an ear pleaser. Opening with storming piano riff, the lo-fi home recording feels anthemic from the outset. The weariness in Mouton’s voice is earnest as he’s self-aware of his introvert tendencies.”

— Cereal and Sounds

The eponymous rock and roll project of Pete Mouton stays busy. Aptly listed as one of the “Hardest Working DIY Bands on Tour in 2018” by Audiofemme, the band played nearly a hundred shows last year while also demoing songs for an upcoming debut LP. Deviating from the two post-punk leaning releases, the sound draws heavily from Big Star and Tom Petty, but with an energy and brevity more akin to late 70’s budget rock and power pop à la The Nerves.

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DeGreaser (Miami, FL)

DeGreaser — Chill Position

“The driving, growling rock — churned out by self-described ‘dorks that are obsessed with KISS and the Ramones’ — is loud, unabashedly honest, and awesomely infectious in more ways than one.”

— Consequence Of Sound

Have you ever wondered what the love child of Judas Priest and the Ramones would sound like? Look no further: The name is Ben Katzman and the band is DeGreaser. In the midst of running BUFU Records (Tall Juan, Free Pizza, Japanther) and playing in White Fang and Guerilla Toss, Katzman formed DeGreaser. The pop-metal outfit’s dynamic sound, coupled with their diary entry-like songwriting has formed the band’s recognizable world of all things astrology, shredding, and self-improvement.

DeGreaser has played extensively across the United States, playing landmark venues such as Zebulon (Los Angeles), Baby’s All Right (Brooklyn), The Middle East and Great Scott (Boston), Gramps and Las Rosas (Miami). The band has toured alongside Mannequin Pussy, Colleen Green, and Tall Juan, as well as sharing numerous bills with La Luz, Guerilla Toss, Downtown Boys and Potty Mouth.

The latest addition to DeGreaser’s discography is the Colleen Green produced full length, Quarter Life Crisis. The album tells the no-nonsense journey of your twenties, with the universally relatable titles: “Too Old for Retail”; “Cool Point’s Don’t Pay The Rent”, giving you exactly what they say on the tin. Reminiscent of riff conceptors KISS and Van Halen, DeGreaser breathes a new kind of energy to old school rock and roll.

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Lilly Hiatt (Nashville, TN)

“With a tremendous amount of swagger, [Hiatt] wields her guitar like a weapon while that distinctly southern accent of hers delivers vocal melodies that are in turns deep, bluesy, fearless and sweet.”

— The Line Of Best Fit

Trinity Lane isn’t all an expression of anger, but it is an emotional, honest confrontation of Hiatt’s feelings and her past, like how she’s processed her mother’s suicide over the years. Hiatt lost her mom when she was just one year old and was raised by her father, John Hiatt, and his wife Nancy, struggling her whole childhood and adult life thus far with how to process that resentment and grief. And it’s a chronicle of overcoming heartbreak and addiction: “Different, I Guess” is a slow folk ode to losing love, and “Imposter” is about the difficulties her father faced raising his daughter, and the sparks of her mother that still shine through.

“I’ve been thinking a lot about my dad and the strength it took him to keep me going and to bring me to Nashville,” she says about “Imposter.” “Just to keep us together and keep us going, that’s always meant a lot to me. For a long time I felt pretty angry with my mother. But through maturation, I feel like I understand her more these days.”

“She’s never coming back, I think we both know that,” sings Hiatt before cooing with her steady twang, “I count on you.” It’s an incredibly vulnerable and intimate family diary, but never at the expense of a rich and stirring melody perfectly in tune with the modern pulse of Americana. It’s an offering of sonic salvation that Hiatt hopes will do as much for the listener as it has done for her own personal healing.

“It’s really cool to be honest with yourself,” she says. “When I have a clear head and a peaceful mind, that process of looking back at things is so much easier. It’s a very empowering feeling. It has literally saved my soul, songwriting. I would not be here without that and without that outlet of writing.”

The songs on Trinity Lane have even helped Hiatt process things like the death of David Bowie, which functions as a metaphor for a lost lover. On the heavily nineties-tinged “The Night David Bowie Died,” she bids farewell to a relationship and to a musical genius while also evoking Veruca Salt-style vocals and guitars. It was a track written entirely in one stream-of-consciousness, where Hiatt didn’t edit or write anything down – she just sang and played. “That was David Bowie’s little gift to me,” she says with a laugh.

Trinity Lane is full of gifts and full of guts – an album that is a healing process and a road map forward, filled with Hiatt’s wildly expressive approach to songwriting and stark, honest lyrics. To get there, she finally had to put her faith into something she couldn’t see. But to hear that  journey, all you have to do is listen.

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Paul Cherry (Chicago, IL)

Photo by Alexa Viscius

Paul Cherry — Like Yesterday

“Paul Cherry’s Smooth and Psychedelic Debut Album Is a Weirdo-Pop Gem”

— Noisey

Paul Cherewick, monikered Paul Cherry, came up during Chicago’s garage rock golden age of 2014. Despite being in the thick of the DIY scene with up and coming bands such as Twin Peaks and The Lemons, Paul would abandon the all too familiar lofi rock sound of his first EP “on Top” and spend the next 2 years exploring the nuances of jazz and pop, finding his footing with a new sound. Paul Cherry has completely reinvented himself on his upcoming LP, Flavour.

The first single, “Like Yesterday” sets the tone for the record as a brilliantly written, mid-tempo pop ballad. It would fit nicely as a modern addition to Paul McCartney’s “Ram” or Todd Rundgren’s “Something/Anything,” or even Player’s “Baby Come Back.” Paul Cherry crafts melodies on Flavour that sit at the intersection of 1970s yacht rock and Ariel Pink’s lo-fi dream pop. Lyrically, Cherry touches upon millennial culture with references to love in the modern age, phone culture, and giving a conceptually new light-hearted twist to age old old themes of love lost, missed connections and polar political climates.

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Young Valley (Jackson, MS)

Young Valley — Cool Blue Patience

“The guys in Young Valley do a fantastic job of blending rock and country influences on their forthcoming self-titled album. Think of them as a more Southern-sounding Deer Tick or a rootsier T. Hardy Morris. The guns-a-blazing rock of the vengeful ‘Hope It Kills You’ and the Baptist guilt-ridden ‘Howlin’ offer up Southern roots music for people searching high and low for real rock ‘n’ roll.

— Wide Open Country

Jackson, Mississippi’s Young Valley offers points of view from songwriters Zach Lovett, Dylan Lovett, and Spencer Thomas with a trading of styles from traditional country to southern-tinged rock ‘n roll. With the addition of Kell Kellum and Ethan Frink, the 5-piece group lays out a catalogue of catchy melodies, harmonies, and plenty of guitar shred all packaged into well-crafted tunes. “We serve the song. Wherever the song takes us, that’s where we need to go.” This mantra has kept them honest in their approach, and just like their hard-to-look-away kind of stage show, you don’t quite know what to expect next from Young Valley.

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Skinny Dippers (Birmingham, AL)

Skinny Dippers — Mother Angel

Skinny Dippers is an indie/folk band based out of Birmingham, AL. With warm melodies and thought provoking lyrics, Sarah Bretz shares past experiences and emotions through her music. The songs are written in collaboration with bassist John Sims, guitarist Abby Anderson, keyboardist Jackson Gafford and drummer Seth Brown.

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